Excessive Heat Watch in Southern Missouri in Wake of Extreme Heat and Humidity

Desert wasteland.

The National Weather Service has issued an excessive heat watch throughout Missouri beginning July 17 and continuing until Saturday, July 20. Heat index values are expected to be over 100 degrees Fahrenheit and its essential to remember that even though you can’t see the damage the heat is inflicting (like you would with a tornado), excessive heat can be dangerous and even deadly if not handled correctly.

Excessive Heat Watch

On Wednesday, July 17, the National Weather Service (NOAA) issued an excessive heat watch along with a heat advisory for several counties in Missouri. On Wednesday NOAA warned that although there may be scattered showers this afternoon, there will be a heat index from 100 to 108 degrees in the following counties: Bourbon, Crawford, Cherokee, Benton, Morgan, Miller, Maries, Vernon, St. Clair, Hickory, Camden, Pulaski, Phelps, Barton, Cedar, Polk, Dallas, Laclede, Texas, Dent, Jasper, Dade, Greene, Webster, Wright, Newton, Lawrence, Christian, Douglas, Howell, Shannon, McDonald, Barry, Stone, Taney, Ozark, and Oregon County. [1]

From Thursday onward the excessive heat watch will still be in effect, this time in Texas, Dent, Greene, Webster, Wright, Lawrence, Christian, Douglas, Howell, Shannon, McDonald, Barry, Stone, Taney, Ozark, and Oregon County.

Heat Advisory

Texas, Dent, Greene, Webster, Wright, Lawrence, Christian, Douglas, Howell, Shannon, McDonald, Barry, Stone, Taney, Ozark, and Oregon County will all be affected by a heat advisory from Wednesday until Saturday. There are expected highs of around 95 degrees and high humidity in the listed counties. The combination of humidity and heat causes higher chances of heat sickness. [2]

Stay Safe

During these times of excessive heat and humidity, you should remember to drink plenty of water and take breaks if you’re working in the sun. Elderly, young children and pets are especially prone to types of heat illness, so make sure that they are rested, cool, and have drunk enough water. If you’re working outside, NOAA recommends either limiting your strenuous activities, like running or outside jobs, to either the cool of the day or stand in the shade as often as possible.

According to NOAA, heat is one of the leading weather-related killers in the U.S. [3]

Heat graphic (Official photo by weather.gov)
Heat graphic (Official photo by weather.gov)

 

 


Notes:

  1. ^Nws Southern Region Hq Fort Worth, Texas. “National Weather Service Watch Warning Advisory Summary.” 17 July 2019, forecast.weather.gov/showsigwx.php?warnzone=MOZ106&warncounty=MOC149&firewxzone=MOZ106&local_place1=Alton%20MO&product1=Hazardous+Weather+Outlook&lat=36.6939&lon=-91.3989#.XS89hOo5YuU. (go back↩)
  2. ^Nws Southern Region Hq Fort Worth, Texas. “National Weather Service Watch Warning Advisory Summary.” 17 July 2019, forecast.weather.gov/showsigwx.php?warnzone=MOZ106&warncounty=MOC149&firewxzone=MOZ106&local_place1=Alton%20MO&product1=Heat+Advisory&lat=36.6939&lon=-91.3989#.XS89hOo5YuU. (go back↩)
  3. ^Service, National Weather. “Heat Safety Tips and Resources.” 17 July 2019, www.weather.gov/safety/heat. (go back↩)

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